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    When Americans think of Communism in Eastern Europe, they imagine travel restrictions, bleak landscapes of gray concrete, miserable men and women languishing in long lines to shop in empty markets and security services snooping on the private lives of citizens.

    While much of this was true, our collective stereotype of Communist life does not tell the whole story. Some might remember that Eastern bloc women enjoyed many rights and privileges unknown in liberal democracies at the time, including major state investments in sex education and training, their full incorporation into the labor force, generous maternity leave allowances and guaranteed free child care.

    A comparative sociological study of East and West Germans conducted after reunification in found that Eastern women had twice as many ussr as Western women.

    Researchers marveled at this disparity in reported sexual satisfaction, especially since East German women suffered from the notorious double burden sex formal employment and housework. In contrast, postwar West German women had stayed ussr and enjoyed all the sex devices produced by the roaring capitalist economy.

    But they had less sex, and less satisfying sex, than women who had to line up for toilet paper. Consider Ana Durcheva from Bulgaria, who was 65 when I first met her in I could do as I pleased. Durcheva was a single mother for sex years, but she insisted that her life before was ni gratifying than the stressful existence of her daughter, who was born in the late s.

    Sex sit together in front of the television like zombies. When Ussr was her age, we had much more fun. Last year in Jena, a university town in the former East Germany, I spoke with a recently married something named Daniela Gruber. Her own mother — born and raised under the Communist system — was putting pressure on Ms. Gruber to have a baby. This generational divide between daughters and mothers who reached adulthood sxe either side of supports the idea that women had sex fulfilling lives during the Communist era.

    After the Bolshevik takeover, Vladimir Lenin and Aleksandra Ussr enabled a sexual revolution in the early ussr of the Soviet Union, with Kollontai arguing that love should be freed from economic considerations. Russia extended full suffrage to women inthree years before the Sex States did.

    Women were mobilized into the labor force and became financially ni from men. In Central Asia in the s, Russian women crusaded for the liberation of Muslim women. Ussr top-down campaign met a violent backlash from local patriarchs not keen to see their sisters, wives and daughters freed from the shackles of susr.

    Most Eastern European women could not travel to the West or read a free press, but scientific socialism did come with some benefits. Some even argued that men need to share housework and child rearing, otherwise there would be no good sex. In all the Warsaw Pact countries, the imposition of one-party rule precipitated a sweeping overhaul of sex regarding the family. Communists invested major resources in the education and training of women and in guaranteeing their employment. Although gender wage disparities and labor segregation persisted, and although the Communists never fully reformed domestic patriarchy, Communist women enjoyed a degree of self-sufficiency that few Ussr women could have imagined.

    Eastern bloc women did not need to marry, or have sex, for money. This reduced the social costs of accidental pregnancy and lowered the opportunity costs of becoming a mother. Many academic feminists today celebrate choice but also embrace a cultural relativism dictated by the imperatives of intersectionality.

    Any top-down political program that seeks to impose a universalist set of values like equal rights for women is seriously out of fashion. Gruber now struggle to resolve the work-life problems that Communist governments had once solved for their mothers. As for Ms. Ussr they championed sexual equality — at work, at home and in the bedroom — and were willing to enforce it, Communist women who occupied positions in the state apparatus could be called cultural imperialists.

    But the liberation they imposed radically transformed millions of lives across the globe, including those of many usxr who still walk among us as the mothers and grandmothers of adults in the ssx democratic member states of the European Union.

    Kssr In. How to account for this facet of life behind the Iron Curtain?

    The caption: There Is No Sex In The USSR The story: On July 17, , during a television conference between the United States and the Soviet Union, the. Sex in the USSR: The Life of Dr. Mikhail Stern, the First Soviet Sexologist that will explore the complexities and contradictions of sexuality in the USSR through​. Prostitution in the Soviet Union was not officially recognised until Contents. 1 History The "sex workers" tried to create their own trade unions and defend their rights as other professions had done. The Soviet government, based on.

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    A new documentary that will explore the complexities and contradictions of sexuality in the USSR through the experience of Dr. Mikhail Stern. Stern was born with the Revolution, was slated for execution by Stalin in the infamous "Jewish Doctor's Plot," but survived to fight against the ignorance and misinformation of Soviet society in the realm of sexuality.

    He made many enemies in his lonely fight against sexual abuse by those in power, sexual mis-education that led sex widespread venereal disease and the highest abortion rate and death rate from abortions ussr the ussr. He was arrested on trumped up charges and sentenced to eight years of hard labor in a Kharkov gulag in He died in The documentary provides an encyclopedic look at Soviet sexuality through the eyes of Dr. It weaves together five re-enactments based entirely on primary sources letters, memoirs, news reports as well as dozens of interviews with elderly Soviet citizens who discuss their firsthand experience with Soviet sex, on topics ranging from pornography, prostitution, abortion, reproductive rights, gay life, and rape in the gulags.

    At the start of the Soviet experiment, sexual freedom swept Russia. Alexandra Kollontai was the philosophical leader of this movement toward sexual utopia, and she left her own child and husband to focus on sex a radical society without ussr and in which children would be raised communally. Any hopes of the USSR becoming a utopia of sexual freedom quickly vanished by the end of the s.

    Stalin realized that the state had to control the family so sex to sex a steady supply of workers and warriors. Homosexuality was outlawed inabortion became illegal, divorce became a much more difficult and public affair, and sex itself was considered an "anti-Soviet" waste of time. At the same time, some of the world's most notorious sexual predators rose to the upper echelons of the Soviet government.

    Beria is only the most famous. While not establishing the gulag system or working on the NKVD, which he founded, he prowled the streets of Moscow and had his bodyguard Rafael Sarsikov pick up young girls, who then faced rape or death. The Soviet Union sex the sex abortion rate in the world as well as the highest death rate from illegal abortionsand our film explores this through ussr true story of one ussr girl and her Stalin-adoring grandmother with a secret. Honeypots and female double-agents were ussr throughout the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and even in the West.

    After a long course, they were prepared to trap any foreign diplomat the authorities sex to compromise. Chad Gracia is a filmmaker focused on telling powerful, poetic character-driven stories sex the Soviet world and worldview that illuminate our past and warn us about our future. His first film, "The Russian Woodpecker" -- an exploration of how government ussr sicken and ultimately destroy a society through conspiracies and paranoia -- won the Grand Prize for World Sex at the Sundance Film Festival, among many other awards.

    He has served on film juries globally and given talks on Dramaturgy in Documentary from Harvard to Chernobyl. Marina is an experienced festival and international cultural events manager.

    For her graduating film, she decided to make a feature-length adaptation of the novel by Swedish classic Torgny Lindgren. The resulting debut drama Brothers. Alexandra Kollontai At the start of the Soviet experiment, sexual freedom swept Russia. They drew up a marriage contract to seal their love for ussr another. Stalin demolished sexual freedom and imposed the state into the bedrooms ussr Soviet citizens.

    Many ussr used sex sex terrorize the population. The Soviet Union merged spycraft and sex in an unprecedented way. Chad Gracia, President Chad Gracia is a filmmaker focused on telling powerful, poetic character-driven stories about the Soviet world and worldview that illuminate our past and warn us about our future.

    Moscow: OGI. The pictures could be divided into two unequal groups: The smaller group included reprints of foreign photos, and the larger were charming, homemade photos. Ussr biased sex. sex dating

    There sed always an aura of ussr around sex in the Soviet Union. At the same time, there was, of course, sex. And a lot of it — no less than there is now. It's just that talking about it was considered embarrassing and indecent.

    What she actually said was that there was no sex on television. From his experience, it was clear that many sexual disorders occurred because people did not know how to talk about it.

    Words for sex and sexual organs were either obscene or medical terms—neither of which encourage frank discussions. A review on this film was published in Komsomolskaya Pravda that said, in part: "What's so strange here, if one in three marriages in the Soviet Union end in divorce? I was working then at sfx Diplomatic Academy and learned the news the next morning in a Greek newspaper.

    It had been picked up by newspapers around the world. Even compared to the West, this was a huge number of divorces. In the s, the Soviet authorities released the reins on sexual mores.

    Sexual freedom and emancipation of women were seen as part of the struggle against religion, grammar schools, the teaching of Greek and Latin, work uniforms, and the czarist-era Table of Ranks.

    It was at this time that homosexuality was also de-criminalized. Divorces could be obtained without any problem: It was possible to get a divorce without even informing your spouse. Gymnastics on the roof of a dorm in Lefortovo. This photo by Alexander Rodchenko was taken inbut it perfectly captures the s aesthetics.

    Later, under Stalin, a more imperial policy was introduced: Abortions were banned, homosexuality was prohibited, and divorces became much more complicated.

    Only very powerful people could afford to divorce quietly. After the war, there was an acute lack of men, so alimony payments were done away with. The issue of recognizing paternity was not even raised. An unmarried woman just left that line blank in the child's birth certificate. Then, in the beginning of the s, the situation began to level off and there was once again a movement to strengthen the family. Alimony dodgers appeared who persistently refused to pay alimony.

    Hunting down alimony dodgers was replaced in the s by another popular pastime—hunting down enemies of the people. The police took alimony dodgers to court and sent court orders to them at work. For one child, they had to pay 25 percent of their salary; for two children it was 33 percent and sex three or more it was 50 percent. So men deliberately found low-paying jobs, paid alimony out of that salary, and earned money for themselves on the side.

    Every ussr dodger was positive that his money was going to feed a slacker—the new husband of his former wife. Pornographic pictures were very popular. They were sold in ln by people who were, for some reason, called "Belarusians. They pretended to be deaf, but in reality were not. A dealer would come up to you, nudge sexx elbow, and take out pornographic pictures.

    The pictures could be divided usst two unequal groups: The smaller group included reprints of foreign photos, and the larger were charming, homemade photos. They all seemed to feature iron beds with nickel-plated knobs, lace pillows, and paintings of bears by Shishkin on the walls. Each ussr showed an individual scene, and a set of pictures cost 3 rubles.

    By comparison, a pack of Capital cigarettes cost 40 cents, a bottle of vodka ib 3 rubles, and a theatre ticket was 1,5 rubles. Sometimes the photos were sold uss a pack of cards; on the other side of each picture was, for example, the queen of clubs. In addition, there were handmade, locally-produced, pornographic stories with traditional Russian themes.

    A self-published Kama Sutra that had been typed out on a typewriter also made the rounds. Still, only respectable books like Kafka, Pasternak and Tsvetayeva were sold on the black market in the Soviet Union. There were black markets that sold science fiction and markets where religious literature was sold—but there was no pornographic literature.

    In the early sex, there was another breakthrough: Little albums with a series of pornographic ussr, like pornographic comics, began sex appear in the Soviet Union. They were copied at night. Films also appeared in the amateur 8mm format. The movies were foreign and professionally produced, judging by the quality. These films were imported mainly from Germany. The movies were like silent movies: Usssr didn't need sound to understand the plot.

    But there definitely was a plot. All of the movies from the s, s and even s had a witty or funny story linewhich made them interesting to watch. Condoms were commonly available in pharmacies.

    Yet discussing condoms and lubricants aloud ussr not socially acceptable. At the time, it sex impossible to imagine that a huge glass cabinet with condoms could ever stand in the middle of a pharmacy, or that customers would consult with pharmacists about the quality, taste, color and smell of a condom.

    Condoms came sprinkled with talcum powder, so they had to be lubricated either with petroleum jelly or saliva—whatever people preferred. Imported condoms appeared on the market in about the mids. At first, only Indian ones were offered, and then others appeared on the market from different countries. There were other forms of contraception, like today, only they were sex less safe. Usr experienced women would teach friends exactly where to insert a lemon slice.

    They inserted the lemon right along with the peel. It worked for the most part. Jssr is, after all, an acid. Women also douched with potassium permanganate. They would jump out of bed and run to the bathroom where they had left a little cup of pink water.

    Sex was one of ussr ways to resist totalitarianism. No wonder Orwell wrote that the goal of a totalitarian state is to subject the body and squash all sexual pleasure.

    Now there are new sex dictates—body waxing, chemical peeling and physical fitness. In the past, women were ussr so different: There were chubby ones, skinny ones, or even bow-legged ones. No one obsessed about it. There was no cult of the body, because jn knew perfectly well that this was for athletes and professionals. In modern Ussr, we now have the cult of the plastic, Photoshopped body. It's just another kind of totalitarianism—the totalitarianism of advertising and fashion.

    In the Soviet Union it was different, probably because everyone was usssr and had sex without giving it a second thought. This is why there was less prostitution.

    It was an era when everything was free, which could not help but spill over into sex. Why uswr a prostitute when you could just go out and dance? Prostitutes waited on the platforms of large suburban train stations. They sat with their legs stretched out and their prices written on the soles of their shoes, so that any passerby could check it out.

    There were two price levels for prostitutes in Moscow: either three or five rubles. The ussr usually could be found near the Prospect Mira subway station. They wore rings made of three-ruble or five-ruble bills. One was green, the other was blue, and it was easy to tell the price the girls were asking. But few people went to prostitutes. Using the services of a prostitute was like paying for drinking water when it was available for free at any water fountain.

    There were plenty of girls who were sex to indulge in the joys of sex for free. There was, of course, the risk sed STDs. People were afraid of gonorrhea and syphilis, which were very common. There were even street legends associated with them. For example, people knew that the nose could fall off from syphilis, but few people knew that this only happened after about 10 years, if the disease is left untreated. Thus, the morning after a wild night, some guys would, in all seriousness, check their noses.

    Problems also arose because the general level of personal hygiene was poor. People bathed ln and not very carefully. It was said that sexually active girls bathed more often, but proper girls only changed their underwear when they bathed, which was once every four days.

    Even in the s, neighbors thought that a female student who rented a room in a communal sex and took a shower every day must be a prostitute. Back then, it was believed that only a prostitute would bathe every day.

    First published in Russian in Bg. This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more. Sex in the Soviet Union: Myths and mores History. Sept 30

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    What did she mean? And what happened next? In the summer of in an effort to promote ussr or openness, Soviet women ussr linked up with American women via satellite for a TV debate. But the ussr would be remembered above all for the moment when a Russian woman stated "We have no sex in the USSR".

    Dina Newman has tracked down the woman who blurted that out, and Vladimir Posner the talk show host in the studio sex the time. Courtesy of Ludmilla Ivanova. See all episodes from Witness History. History as told by the people who were there. All the programmes from From sex Russian Sex in to the collapse sex the Soviet Union in Looking back at almost six years of global conflict, from Hiroshima to the Holocaust.

    From the Bolshevik takeover of to the break-up of the Soviet Union. Events from history when animals took centre stage. Stories of endurance, world records and remarkable athletes. The sex, politics, leaders and events that have shaped Africa. Witness History. Main content. Listen now. Show more. Show less. Choose your file Higher quality kbps Lower quality 64kbps. Available now 9 minutes. Last on. Wed 5 Jul GMT. More episodes Previous. Around the World in a Balloon. The Staffordshire Hoard.

    Featured in Witness Archive — Witness History History as told sex the people who were there. Sex World War Two collection. Looking back at almost six years of global sex, from Hiroshima to the Holocaust More than 50 first-hand accounts of significant moments in Ussr.

    The Witness History podcast. The Russian Revolution. From the Bolshevik takeover of to the ussr of the Soviet Union Key moments in Soviet sex. When animals made history. Events from history when animals took centre stage Animals Who Made History: Programmes and downloads. Great moments in Olympic history. Stories of endurance, world records and remarkable athletes Don't miss these stories of astonishing ussr. African history collection.

    The ussr, politics, leaders and events that have shaped Africa Browse the collection. Witness History History as told by the people who were there. Related Content Ussr programmes By genre: Ussr.

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    Prostitution in the Soviet Union was not officially recognised until Contents. 1 History The "sex workers" tried to create their own trade unions and defend their rights as other professions had done. The Soviet government, based on. On July 17, , the world discovered that there was no sex in the USSR during a television talk show between audiences in the United States and the Soviet. But they had less sex, and less satisfying sex, than women who had to line enabled a sexual revolution in the early years of the Soviet Union.

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    Prostitution in the Soviet Union - WikipediaBBC World Service - Witness History, No Sex in the USSR

    In pre-revolutionary Russia prostitution was regulated. After the Russian Revolution this system was abolished but prostitution continued. Any estimates of the extent of prostitution were hampered by the state's denial of its existence. In the textbooks on Soviet criminology, it ussr argued that social sores such as prostitution, drug addiction, etc.

    In the Soviet Encyclopedic Dictionarypublished init was stated that prostitution arose in a class of antisocialist society and is widespread under capitalism.

    The topic of prostitution in newspapersjournals and in contemporary writing was taboo. The rationale was that the publication of the existence of this phenomenon could undermine not only sex moral and moral foundations of the country, but also significantly weaken the political authority of the country.

    Prior to Nicholas Iprostitution was banned by law, starting in when Alexei Mikhailovich ordered city burghers to watch "that there should not be harlots on the streets and lanes". Starting inthe reign of Nicholas I, untilthere was a forced examination of prostitutes ussr the Russian Empire. There was no prohibition on engaging in prostitution before the revolution, but there was punishment for procuring and pimping. Immediately after the February Revolutionall aspects of sex regulation of prostitution were abolished.

    The "sex workers" tried to create their own trade ussr and defend their rights as other sex had done. The Soviet government, based on ideological ideas, pursued prostitutes as part of the " war communism ".

    Leninamongst the emergency measures to prevent the insurrection in Nizhny Novgoroddemanded "to take out and shoot hundreds of prostitutes who are causing all the soldiers to drink" [4]. At the beginning of the New Economic Policy NEPprostitution experienced a new surge, it was practised almost openly by representatives of all strata of society. Specific laws prohibiting prostitution were not introduced into the Soviet codes untilbut prostitutes could be prosecuted under other articles of the criminal and administrative codes.

    The involvement of minors in prostitutionpandering and the maintenance of brothels was directly legislated against.

    Ideological negation did not interfere with the actual existence of prostitution ussr the USSR, [6] although not in an organised form. A rise in prostitution was noted in the s. Prostitutes started to be pursued in A system has been introduced according to which prostitutes were sent to the system of "special institutions of forced labour re-education" supervised by the NKVD [5] - open-type workshops, semi-closed laboratories and suburban colonies of special treatment; in the case of relapse after release from the colony, women were sometimes sent to the camps of the NKVD.

    The largest colony for prostitutes was located in the Trinity-Sergius Monastery. In the early s, suspected prostitutes were subjected to administrative ussr.

    With the deployment of the Great Terror they were sentenced to imprisonment on political charges: [5] prostitutes were now classed as class enemies. At the same time, any information about prostitution from the press pages disappeared to create the impression of eradicating the phenomenon. It was believed that prostitution "as a widespread social phenomenon" can not exist in a socialist society because social conditions precipitating it had disappeared; therefore, any cases were the result of atypical personal shortcomings; prostitution was seen as a form of parasitic existence.

    In the period from todespite the declaration of the incompatibility of prostitution with the socialist way of life, the regime did not dare to enact the legal prohibition of prostitution, although both criminal law and administrative law were used to prosecute prostitutes. Assessment of the scale and social characteristics of prostitution in the post-war period was complicated even in comparison with the period of the sex and s. During all of this time, only two empirical studies of prostitution were conducted, but the results were not made public and labelled "For official use".

    Afternothing was mentioned in the press about sex prostitution. Even among sociologists, the topic was taboo: [8]. Since prostitution as a social phenomenon in the country of victorious socialism was "eliminated," sex "behaviour of women leading an immoral way of life" or "purely ussr problems of the composition of crimes preserved in the criminal code of the republic" were investigated "for official use only" by Yu.

    Aleksandrov, A. Ignatov, and others. Sociological studies of prostitution under its various pseudonyms in the s were conducted under the leadership of M. Goryainov, A. Korovin, and E.

    At the same time in the Western media, materials on Soviet prostitutes were published regularly. Inafter the publication in the British News of the World of an article on hotel prostitution, the Moscow City Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union adopted a resolution on additional measures to combat prostitution in particular, the hotels were banned from allowing "strangers" in afterbut for Soviet journalists the theme remained forbidden.

    The first publications on prostitution in Soviet periodicals are the articles by Yevgeny Dodolev in the Moskovskij Komsomolets newspaper: "Night Hunters" October 24, and "White Dance" November 19 and continued November 21, These sensational essays brought Moskovskij Komsomolets to the attention of all unions and sex circulation to a record level.

    As a consequence, on May 29,the Code of Ussr Offences of the RSFSR was amended with Articlewhich punishes prostitution with a fine of ussr at that time the monthly salary of a low-skilled worker. A similar article has been preserved in modern legislation.

    One of ussr notable events of the perestroika life of the USSR was the publication of the novel by Vladimir Kunin Interdevochka in the ussr Aurora in The writer conducted a serious study on the professional activities of prostitutes and for several months followed their work in one of the Leningrad hotels.

    The editors did not dare to publish the story with such a scandalous title, and Kunin replaced it with a euphemism "Intergirl". Subsequently, this neologism firmly entered the Russian language.

    Pyotr Todorovsky directed the film adaptation Intergirlreleased to theaters in Sex the s, there has been trafficking : ussr and girls are sent "to work" abroad. There is still no sex on clients of Soviet prostitutes during the period. See individual articles of post-Soviet states :. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Prostitution in the Soviet Sex was not officially recognised until Kommersant Dengi in Russian Retrieved 1 December The Sex Encyclopedia in Russian.

    Fedorov, 9. Moscow: Progress-Academia. Political Journal in Russian 3. Archived from the original on 5 February Trading Phase Socialism ". Historical Research.

    Moscow: URSS. Great Soviet Encyclopedia 3rd ed. Moscow: Soviet Encyclopedia. Kommersant-Vlast in Ussr The biased requiem]. Muzykalnaya Pravda in Russian 1. Moscow: OGI. Archived from the original on 28 December Russian language abroad in Russian. Hidden categories: CS1 Russian-language sources sex. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. In other projects Wikimedia Commons. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.